Hina-Matsuri (Doll’s Festival) / 雛祭りの飾り~3月3日までお楽しみ頂けます 

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A beautiful display of dolls to wish for girls happiness welcome you at the entrance between Feb.16 and March 3.
Please take your time to see Japanese tradition of praying for daughters healthy growth and enjoy the beauty of Japanese craft of making dolls.

平安時代より遊びごととして貴族の間で始まり、江戸時代には女子の健やかな成長を願う行事として広まっていった雛祭り。
日本の美しい伝統文化の象徴ともいえる雛人形の飾りをエントランスでご覧いただけます。
3月3日まで展示しておりますのでぜひお立ち寄りの際はご覧ください。


March 3 is Hina Matsuri (Dolls Festival or Girls’ Festival), when people pray for the happiness and healthy growth of girls. Families with young daughters mark this day by setting up a display of dolls inside the house.

The dolls wear costumes of the imperial court during the Heian period (794-1192) and are placed on a tiered platform covered with red felt. The size of the dolls and number of steps vary, but usually the displays are of five or seven layers; single-tiered decorations with one male and one female doll are also common.

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The top tier is reserved for the emperor and the empress. A miniature gilded folding screen is placed behind them, just like the real Imperial throne of the ancient court. On the second tier are three ladies-in-waiting, and on the third are five male court musicians. Ministers sit on either side of trays of food on the fourth step, and the fifth row features guards flanked by an orange tree to the left and a cherry tree to the right.

The practice of displaying these dolls on the third day of the third month on the traditional Japanese calendar began during the Edo period (1603-1868). It started as a way of warding off evil spirits, with the dolls acting as a charm.

Most families take their beautiful collection of dolls out of the closet around mid-February and put it away again as soon as Hina Matsuri is over. This is because of an old superstition that families that are slow in putting back the dolls have trouble marrying off their daughters.